This City Lost 1 Million Pounds–Now It’s Redesigning Itself To Keep Them Off | Co.Exist

Partly using proceeds from a one-penny sales tax passed in late 2009, it’s now in the process of making a slate of improvements, including a 70-acre park that will link the city’s downtown with the Oklahoma River, a new streetcar line and river kayaking facility, a senior wellness center, and hundreds of miles of jogging, walking, and biking trails.

It’s also making sure there are gyms in all grade schools and is narrowing all the downtown streets to add trees to wider, more pedestrian-friendly sidewalks.

via This City Lost 1 Million Pounds–Now It’s Redesigning Itself To Keep Them Off | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.

Why Walking Helps Us Think | The New Yorker


What is it about walking, in particular, that makes it so amenable to thinking and writing?

The answer begins with changes to our chemistry. When we go for a walk, the heart pumps faster, circulating more blood and oxygen not just to the muscles but to all the organs—including the brain.

Walking on a regular basis also promotes new connections between brain cells, staves off the usual withering of brain tissue that comes with age, increases the volume of the hippocampus (a brain region crucial for memory), and elevates levels of molecules that both stimulate the growth of new neurons and transmit messages between them.

via Why Walking Helps Us Think – The New Yorker.

Five things Canadians get wrong about the health system | The Globe and Mail


Canada has extensive public financing for essential physician services and hospital care – among the highest rates in the world.

But most Canadians have to pay for eye and dental care out-of-pocket,

and more than 60 per cent of prescription medications are paid for privately in Canada.

via Five things Canadians get wrong about the health system – The Globe and Mail.

How Staten Island Is Fighting a Raging Heroin and Prescription-Pill Epidemic


If naloxone could reverse pain relief when no drugs were present, researchers guessed that the body must have its own pain-relief systems.

“Endorphin,” the word, comes from “endogenous morphine.” A number of such natural chemicals were later found, along with receptors in the brain upon which they and the opioids acted.

via How Staten Island Is Fighting a Raging Heroin and Prescription-Pill Epidemic.